Take Me There

"The granite above Kicheche Mara Camp is my favourite place on earth. I can see for miles, there are animals aplenty and most importantly it means I am 'home'. " D.T. Shropshire, UK Currently we are stalled at a red light. Thank you for the fertile acres of frustrated prose you have sent to us supporting Kicheche and the Conservancies, particularly pertinent today on Earth Day. The pain we feel is clearly reciprocated. Right now a distraction is called for judging by your yearning messages.

Sleepy Hollow

You know the mark of anyone when they go above and beyond. Waaaaay beyond. Jimmy Tinka and David Nchoe are off duty, one even at home on leave. Yesterday afternoon Jimmy picked up a sketchy text: something about a Tamarind tree and leopards. The plural was not wasted on him.

Crown Caught

When Valley Camp royalty like Bernard Soit exclaim they have never seen a particular eagle before, you know you are talking twitching nobility.

Dyer need for a safari

Meet Laura Dyer, Kicheche has become her Hotel California ... she 'can try to check out any time she likes but she can never leave'. Laura extended her safari three times, finally returning home after five weeks. Thank you Laura, these are her heartfelt lyrics:

Priceless

The plains of Laikipia still remain a high altitude garrison for rhino. Within minutes from Kicheche's northern stronghold, the black and white numbers are not only stable, but flourishing. Spending time with these prehistoric ruminants is not just good for the eye, but for the soul. This area of Kenya remains seemingly impregnable, yet it is not the same all over Africa and elsewhere. Rhinos need protection everywhere, this is obvious, but they also need tourists. They do NOT need petty rules and redlists denying them priceless tourism dollars.

Sign of the Times

A couple of days ago I read an itinerant post of safari one-upmanship braying that 'the best part of their bargain-priced safari was that they had the whole place to themselves'. This is the fundamental challenge that is facing the safari industry. These pilgrims probably could not see beyond their camouflage but for many the suffering is very real and widespread.